Tag Archives: Deadpool

Deadpool Valentine

So… there’s a Deadpool movie. You probably know about that. It’s also Valentine’s Day tomorrow… You probably knew that too. But what happens if you combine them?

Deadpool Valentine

I wanted to hand-draw something Deadpool related for the movie this weekend… and inspiration struck when I realized it was also Valentine’s Day and I thought of a (hopefully) humorous way to combine them. For anyone wondering, it’s meant to be fairly cartoony. It helps take a bit of the edge off of the implied gore. I also probably couldn’t have hand-drawn a non-cartoony Deadpool without more practice anyway. 😉

I didn’t scan in a rough-sketch image this time, because I kind of alternated between sketching in parts of this and inking them… so, for example, I sketched then inked Deadpool first… then the bow and quiver, and then the doors in the background. I’m not sure why I did it that way, as opposed to a complete rough sketch before beginning inking… but there you go.

Whenever I do something like this, as I’m finishing it I start thinking how it would look cleaner if I digitally inked and colored it instead… but then I wouldn’t have a piece of original art in my hands. I would also lose a little of the organic feel to the lines that I get from hand-rendering. This particular gag wouldn’t suffer either way, but sometimes the too-clean digital rendering actually distracts from the funny. At least it seems like it to me.

Let me know what you think, and remember, if you’d like an original commission by me or would like to hire me as an Illustrator, please use the Contact page and let me know as much as you can about your request.

Deadpool Sketch Cards

Next up in my series of sketch cards are a couple of the Marvel Comics character, Deadpool. One is a movie poster parody (Dead Calm) while the other is a coin flip gag…

Deadpool Calm

SK03-Deadpool-Calm

I Call Heads

SK04-Deadpool-I-Call-Heads

Tracers 2: The Retracening

So, back in February of this year I wrote a blog post about tracing entitled ‘Trace, The Final Frontier?’ It had spun out of a conversation I was having on the Digital Webbing forums with many other people about the merits and acceptance (or lack thereof) of tracing when creating artwork. I’m not going to rehash the discussion here, as I believe I said everything I wanted to say in that blog post, but please revisit that previous entry to get some context for this one.

I decided this past weekend to revisit my original tracing of Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool. There were things I never liked about it, but it was also a very quick and dirty attempt that at the time was merely so that I could have a visual entry into the discussion. Here is a more thorough and better detailed version of that illustration.

Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool RevisedBasically I started from scratch and didn’t use anything I had done before. If you compare the two versions I created, you will observe some common strokes. I view that as an indicator that even though I looked at the photograph months apart, I still identified many of the same curves and shadows. The primary difference is that I spent a lot more time with this one and finished the coloring and shading work.

The only bit I struggle with here, is I think I might have overdone the highlights in the hair. It looks like he had a plate of spaghetti dumped over him in some places! Please let me know what you think. Remember, if you are interested in requesting my services as an Illustrator, please use the Contact page and let me know as much as you can about your request.

LEGO My Spider-Man!

As promised and feared… my first LEGO building block drawing. It’s one of my oldie-but-goodies re-imagined LEGO-style! Spider-Man has never looked so much like a block-head. 🙂

Spider-Man LEGO Head
On the left is without the webbing overlay for the face. The neat thing about this Spider-Man mask is that it’s also basically a Deadpool mask if you leave off the webbing. Two birds with one block! Technically, a lot of blocks… but you literally get the picture here.

There are a few tweaks here and there I could make to improve this a little… but it mostly looks like what I wanted, and I had promised some LEGO art soon and didn’t want to disappoint anyone. Please let me know what you think… and also if you want to see more.

Trace, The Final Frontier?

So, I was participating in a discussion about tracing this weekend on a Web forum. This comes up from time to time, it’s just the first time I’ve been active in such a discussion online. I’m not even going to get into the penciller vs inker debate, that is a tangent discussion. For the purposes of this blog post, I’m strictly talking about tracing photographs. The usual camps formed:

  1. Tracing is evil and wrong and you are evil and wrong for tracing!
  2. Tracing is okay for practice, but real artists don’t need to trace.
  3. Tracing is an acceptable art form.

I’m firmly in the #3 camp with a caveat that I will get to in a minute. For beginners, I think tracing is good practice. When you’re initially studying art, and anatomy in particular, you will waste a lot of time drawing a lot of wrong things if you don’t trace a little to get yourself used to where things go. Part of learning how to draw is learning how to compose a complex illustration from simple strokes on the page. If you start by tracing you will simultaneously enhance your brain’s ability to see the composition in smaller parts, and your hand and arm will get used to the motions so that it feels natural to you.

Think of a golfer learning to swing. You can go in there and pick a club and just start swinging… but you can’t really see what you are doing and you will waste a lot of time tiring yourself out swinging incorrectly before you accidentally do it right a few times. Most golfers will watch other people swing and try to emulate that at first. You can even have your swing analyzed by a computer or hire a personal trainer. It will still take a lot of practice to get good at golf, but you cut the initial learning time dramatically by using all the available helper tools that you can.

So, now let’s say you are a good artist and don’t need to trace anymore. Why would you do it? Well, now that you know how to draw and you can do it… tracing is still useful. You can do the work much faster by tracing even if you don’t need to do it. Can you draw a straight line without a ruler? Can you draw that same straight line a lot faster, and probably cleaner as well, with a ruler? Would you refuse to use a ruler just to keep purity in your art?

I was at the Raleigh Comic-Con last year as a guest, and I was doing small sketches during the show. At one point I was going to draw Captain America’s shield. The artist next to me said, matter-of-factly, that he wouldn’t dare draw a circle freehand and that I was brave to try. I was sketching my circles on a quadrant so I really was only drawing four connected arcs to make my circles. This allowed me to be pretty fast at sketching and create reasonably good circles. Truth be told, though, he was absolutely right. I could have drawn the same circles much faster and cleaner with the right tools. I know how to draw circles and I can draw them with a little patience… but there’s nothing to be gained from refusing to use the right tool for the job.

And now comes the caveat. In my opinion there are only two unacceptable practices in tracing. First, I believe you should not try to pass off your work as if you didn’t trace. Own the practice, own your creation! If you traced some photographs to make it better or finish it faster, embrace it and don’t run from it. Second, make sure you are using photographs in the public domain or ones that you take yourself or otherwise have obtained the rights to use in your art.

If you embrace it, have permission to do it, and it makes your art better… I say trace all you want. Embrace the trace!

Meanwhile, as part of that discussion thread… people started posting their version of a trace of Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool from a movie still photograph. I didn’t want to feel left out, so I took a stab at tracing the photograph myself and am posting it here on my blog. I colored the clothing and accessories, but stopped there as the purpose of the exercise had been served at that point for me.

What was interesting, and perhaps surprising to some in the discussion, every person’s trace of the exact same photograph came out looking differently… which means even when we trace, our personal style is coming through in the final product.

Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool WIP

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